Society of St. Columban © St. Columban’s Widney Manor Rd, Knowle, Solihull. West Midlands B93 9AB

Tel. 01564 772096colsol@columbans.co.uk      www.columbans.co.uk

 

BRITAIN

 

Columban

Missionaries

Media

‘Come and See’

LM Co-ordinator

St Columban’s,

Widney Manor Rd,

Knowle, Solihull.

West Mids B93 9AB

Tel: 01564 772096

Clmuk@columbans.co.uk

 

Rosalia Basada said: When I arrived at the airport I got the impression that Birmingham is Multi-cultural. I have seen different races mostly Asians and Africans. I can tell through skin complexions. I have heard different languages. Culturally it was not so different from what I already knew about Birmingham. Before coming here I read about the country but it was easier than the real thing.

 

I felt the weather was not good. People are wearing sweaters, socks, scarves and boots. These  things are  at all unlike home because we have tropical climate in the Philippines. Until now I am adjusting to the weather  and I am wearing warm stuffs.

 

The first time I went to mass I saddened when I saw  small number of people and mostly old people. I was looking for the younger ones. I was Happy when I saw the children during Sunday Mass.

 

On my tour around Birmingham. I met friendly people, Its truly inspiring! They are loving, respecting and supporting each other. And those people have a great warm sense of humour.

 

?  When I first arrived in Birmingham specifically in Sparkhill (where we are now presently living) , I can't help but asked myself; “Am I in Birmingham or in Pakistan?”, because our neighbours and most of the people I see are Pakistani wearing their nationality dress.

 

!  Later when I went around the city, I realized that Birmingham is like a mixing pot of races. There are many people rom different nationalities, cultures and faith all around the city.

 

*  As I integrate with the people of different nationalities, cultures and beliefs in the city, I observed that generally they also live in harmony. Then I realized perhaps this is what  Inter-cultural and Interfaith living is about.....

                              Ger Samson

When I arrived here in Birmingham I was excited and at the same time nervous, the weather is really the opposite of what I am used to. It is really cold. I call it “weather shock”. And I too  have a multiple-culture shock when I arrived in Sparkhill, where there are many Pakistanis, Hindus and other faiths. I feel like a baby being born again into a new world and there is so much to learn for me to grow.

 

Jonah Jane Enterina

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